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<p>Photo: Eva Deitch </p>

Tour

Public Tours at Dia:Beacon


Dia:Beacon

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27/08/2016 12:30 27/08/2016 15:00 Europe/London Public Tours at Dia:Beacon Dia:Beacon provides guided tours every Saturday and Sunday at 12:30 and 2 pm. Tours are free with admission. Reservations are not necessary but can be made in person at the admissions desk.      Dia:Beacon FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Public Tours at Dia:Beacon
<p>Photo: Don Stahl </p>

Poetry Reading

Ann Stephenson and Carter Ratcliff


Dia:Chelsea

Readings in Contemporary Poetry

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03/10/2017 18:30 03/10/2017 23:45 Europe/London Ann Stephenson and Carter Ratcliff Event DetailsTuesday, October 3, 2017, 6:30 pmDia:Chelsea535 West 22nd Street, 5th FloorNew York City  Free for Dia members; $10 general admission; $6 admission for students and seniors Advance ticket purchases recommended. Tickets are also available for purchase at the door, subject to availability.  Ann Stephenson’s publications include Wirework (2006), Adventure Club (2013), and The Poles (forthcoming). Some of her poems have appeared in Across the Margin, Brooklyn Rail, Delineator, Ladowich, Recluse, and Sal Mimeo, as well as the anthology Like Musical Instruments: 83 Contemporary American Poets (2014). She is the editor of Tent Editions, which will publish work by Marcella Durand and Carol Szamatowicz this fall. She received her MFA from Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, in 2007, and curated the Ready Set Readings series at Whitespace Gallery in Atlanta in 2009–10. Stephenson is also the recipient of a New York Foundation for the Arts Artists’ Fellowship in poetry. She was born and raised in Georgia and lives and works in New York City. Pennants Shone A public service announcement advised me to be myself but that required a context my interiority is buttoned up it’s gonna be my neck rolled up in batting so I don't injure myself more serums for my teen skin type messy in my entirety to accommodate reality referring to a glossary the totality of real things in the world independent of my knowledge or perception a kind of existence or universe connected to or separate from other kinds Carter Ratcliff’s books of poetry include Fever Coast (1973), Give Me Tomorrow (1983), and Arrivederci, Modernismo (2007). His poetry has appeared in such journals as Baffler, Cimarron Review, La Presa, Sienese Shredder, and Vanitas. His first novel, Tequila Mockingbird, was published in 2015. Ratcliff received the Project for Innovative Poetry Gertrude Stein Award in 2005 and the first T-Space Poetry Award in 2013. An art critic as well as a poet, he has published his writing in many journals, including Art in America, Art Presse, Artforum, Artstudio, Modern Painting, and Tate Etc. He is also the editor of several books, such as The Fate of a Gesture: Jackson Pollock and Postwar American Art (1996) and Out of the Box: The Reinvention of Art, 1965–1975 (2000), and has contributed to monographs on Andy Warhol, Gilbert & George, Nabil Nahas, Georgia O’Keeffe, Kit White, and others. Ratcliff has taught at New York University, the City University of New York’s Hunter College, and the New York Studio School. He has received a Poets Foundation grant, several National Endowment for the Arts grants, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the College Art Association’s Frank Jewett Mather Award.    Cult Status Why not justcut to the chase and grant cult status to obsession itself? There’d be the midnight showing,then dawn and the first day of the rest of obsession’s wretched life. Then the near-death experience of 3 a.m.,the white light of wondering if maybe  the entire systemcould be made to understand that already, long ago, when god was a boy,it had stumbled onto a way to short-circuit itself.  I mean, obsessing about obsession is a double negative, right?What could be more positive, more life-affirming, as they used to say,when starvation had cult status and so did fire and dust and the green embersof moss that aligned themselves with the edges of the flagstones. There was a clavicle cult and a cult devoted to knock-knock jokes.Who’s there?  Who isn’t?  The cult of everyone and his brotherwas rivaled only by the cult of wanting to be alone, wanting to be alonewith everyone else who wanted to be alone. Some were obsessed with Parmenides or Krispy Kreme, and those who could think of nothing but the uncertainty principleand getting their mitts on more and more uncertainty principle memorabilia  found that their thoughts either did or did not fill all of heavenwith an aurora borealis of insatiable need. There was no room for thoughts  of obsession itself.  Those were simpler,more innocent times, as they used to say, when things were really complicatedby my memory of the way the very idea of cult status had really loved you, everything had really loved you,even the crush had loved you.  Really, truly loved youand what it really, truly loved was to hate the difference between love and obsession, which is what made the world go round, and what made it go awaywas the knowledge that you would, soon, and so what choice did I have?  I made lateness my truest loveand soonness my obsession, my raison d’être, the object of my cult.     Dia:Chelsea FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Ann Stephenson and Carter Ratcliff
Three-Cornered_Desire (1)

Lecture

Thomas Crow on John Chamberlain


Dia:Beacon

DiaTalks

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14/10/2017 14:30 14/10/2017 23:45 Europe/London Thomas Crow on John Chamberlain Event Details Saturday, October 14, 2017, 2:30 pm Dia:Beacon3 Beekman StreetBeacon, New York Free with museum admission. No reservations required. Thomas Crow is a contributing editor at Artforum and the Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. His most recent books are The Long March of Pop: Art, Music, and Design 1930–1995 (2015) and No Idols: The Missing Theology of Art (2017). Restoration: The Fall of Napoleon in the Course of European Art will be published by Princeton University Press next year. He just concluded the 2017 Paul Mellon Lecture Series at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, Connecticut, and the National Gallery in London: “Searching for the Young Soul Rebels: Style, Music, and Art in London 1956–1969.”     Dia:Beacon FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Thomas Crow on John Chamberlain
<p>Photo: Don Stahl </p>

Special Event

Community Free Day


Dia:Beacon

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14/10/2017 11:00 14/10/2017 18:00 Europe/London Community Free Day Dia:Beacon’s quarterly Community Free Days offer engaging programs suitable for a broad audience, including thematic tours of the collection and special exhibitions, DiaTalks, interactive workshops for children and families, and performances. Admission is free for residents of Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster, and Westchester counties. Event DetailsSaturday, October 14, 201711 am–6 pm  Dia:Beacon, Riggio Galleries3 Beekman StreetBeacon, New York Please bring a driver’s license or other government-issued ID for entry to the museum. Community Free Day is part of the Sackler Institute at Dia Art Foundation.     Dia:Beacon FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Community Free Day
<p>Photo: Don Stahl</p>

Poetry Reading

Sharon Mesmer and Wayne Koestenbaum


Dia:Chelsea

Readings in Contemporary Poetry

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24/10/2017 18:30 24/10/2017 23:45 Europe/London Sharon Mesmer and Wayne Koestenbaum Event DetailsTuesday, October 24, 2017, 6:30 pmDia:Chelsea535 West 22nd Street, 5th FloorNew York City  Free for Dia members; $10 general admission; $6 admission for students and seniors Advance ticket purchases recommended. Tickets are also available for purchase at the door, subject to availability.  Sharon Mesmer’s newest poetry collection, Greetings from My Girlie Leisure Place (2015), was voted “Best of 2015” by Entropy. Her previous poetry collections include The Virgin Formica (2008), Annoying Diabetic Bitch (2007), Vertigo Seeks Affinities (2006), Half Angel, Half Lunch (1998), and Crossing Second Avenue (1997). Four of her poems appear in Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology (second edition, 2013). Other anthology appearances include Brooklyn Poets Anthology (2017), Poems for the Nation (2000), and The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry (1999). She is currently at work on a new collection of poems, Even Living Makes Me Die, inspired by the lives and writings of thirty-five female poets of the Americas, from the nineteenth century to modern times. Her fiction collections include Ma Vie à Yonago (2005), In Ordinary Time (2005), and The Empty Quarter (2000). An excerpt of her story “Revenge” appears in I’ll Drown My Book: Conceptual Writing by Women (2012). Her essays, reviews, and interviews have appeared in the American Poetry Review, Brooklyn Rail, New York Times, and Paris Review, among other places. Her awards include a Fulbright Specialist grant, a Jerome Foundation/SASE award (as mentor to poet Elisabeth Workman in 2009), and two New York Foundation for the Arts fellowships. She teaches in the undergraduate and graduate programs at New York University and the New School, and lives in New York City. Velocity and Turbulence             — to Gabriela Mistral (Lucila Godoy Alcayaga), Chile, 1889-1957 Be always conscious of your wings. Darknessis overtaking, and tension is tired. In the houseof keeping still, all is hollow-eyed, groaning. Shiver and tingle outside the automobile: Grandmais on life support. The nurses found her, called youa wanderer. They knew nothing of resistance— or did they?  Disrobe, as the holiest were often requiredto be naked. Under the serpent dome the sun doorstood open, all of creation flying through it,in radiant rounds of joy.  Take the mantle of an earth-colored insect and make a wandwith twigs and leaves. Use it to conjure the cunning beautyof certain corpses. If performed correctly, their faces will resembleluminous, apricot-colored clouds. Make a pilgrimage to the Mountain of Butterflies — love descendson those defenseless. If your hearth is redolent with the scent of flesh, fan the flames to producea cooling jewel. The ocean-born virgin was nicknamed “Fishy Smell” but her real namewas “Bird.” Find her in the neck of time. Her vaginais enough; you don’t need the legs. Rememberthat initiation takes a lifetime. One day a triangle of lightwill come pouring through the porch. Breathe deep. Everything that torments and suffocates, everythingthat imparts sorrow and despair, is the moving waterthat turns the wheel that transforms airinto tree into prayer into air.Make scribble pictures of the stain on your ceiling and tryto sell them. Very few will buy. When you stall, when your coverts beatto no advantage, you may choose to sacrifice happiness to restorewhat was lost, but the sacrifice itselfis a privilege. How long will it take you to forget this?  Now recall the glory of your wings. Wayne Koestenbaum has published eighteen books of poetry, criticism, and fiction, including Notes on Glaze (2016), The Pink Trance Notebooks (2015), My 1980s & Other Essays (2013), Humiliation (2011), Hotel Theory (2007), Best-Selling Jewish Porn Films (2006), Andy Warhol (2001), Jackie Under My Skin (1995), and The Queen’s Throat (1993), which was a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist. He has had solo exhibitions of his paintings at White Columns in New York City, 356 Mission in Los Angeles, and the University of Kentucky Art Museum in Lexington. His first piano/vocal record, Lounge Act, was issued by Ugly Duckling Presse in 2017. Koestenbaum is a Distinguished Professor of English, Comparative Literature, and French at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center. excerpt from Camp Marmalade (“#12 [the dematerializing marzipan]”) spit on every painting soI can list saliva asingredient, also usecum in every paintingas underlayer_________                      father begged formarzipan—did he pretendto love marzipan so we kidshad something inexpensiveto buy him?_________                                            mothernever bought him marzipan—did he ever buy it for himself?_________           why didmarzipan always comein trompe l’oeil shapes—Elvis Presley, carrot,car, Colosseum, tulip?_________marzipan was a jokefood, sold at underdog shops—no normal stores sold it_________            my sentimentallove for him centeredon his supposed loveof marzipan and theease of satisfying himby buying him marzipanthough it remained amystery whether heactually loved marzipan_________maybe he secretly threw it away—it disappeared shortly afterwe gave it to him—the dematerializing marzipan_________ jetting euphemism isolatescum for extermination—keep mentioning exterminationbecause it’s real, whathe suffered under, andhis suffering (even if heonly rarely mentioned it)became mine—_________          dead boyrevenant, stop knockingon my bedroom window—_________ men who demote meare the ones I desire—rejection’s aphrodisiac Dia:Chelsea FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Sharon Mesmer and Wayne Koestenbaum