Calendar

February 13 to March 15, 2018

<p>Photo: Eva Deitch </p>

Tour

Public Tours at Dia:Beacon


Dia:Beacon

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27/08/2016 12:30 27/08/2016 15:00 Europe/London Public Tours at Dia:Beacon Dia:Beacon provides guided tours every Saturday and Sunday at 12:30 and 2 pm. Tours are free with admission. Reservations are not necessary but can be made in person at the admissions desk.      Dia:Beacon FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Public Tours at Dia:Beacon
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Tour

Public Tours at Dia:Chelsea


Dia:Chelsea

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01/11/2017 14:00 01/11/2017 13:00 Europe/London Public Tours at Dia:Chelsea Dia:Chelsea provides guided tours every Saturday at 2 pm. Tours are free with admission. Reservations are not necessary but can be made in person at the admissions desk located at 545 West 22nd Street in New York City.     Dia:Chelsea FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SA;UNTIL=20260801T235900; Public Tours at Dia:Chelsea
<p>Photo: Don Stahl</p>

Poetry Reading

Steve Dickison and
Julie Ezelle-Patton


Dia:Chelsea

Readings in Contemporary Poetry

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13/02/2018 18:30 13/02/2018 23:45 Europe/London Steve Dickison andJulie Ezelle-Patton Event DetailsTuesday, February 13, 2018, 6:30 pmDia:Chelsea535 West 22nd Street, 5th FloorNew York City  Free for Dia members; $10 general admission; $6 admission for students and seniors Advance ticket purchases recommended. Tickets are also available for purchase at the door, subject to availability.  Steve Dickison is author of Disposed (Post-Apollo Press, 2007) and the forthcoming Zora Neale Hurston’s Liberation Music Orchestra (Omnidawn, 2018). With David Meltzer in 2002–06, he coedited the music magazine Shuffle Boil. Dickison is coeditor of the anthologies Prison/Culture (City Lights Foundation, 2009) and Homage to Etel Adnan (Post-Apollo Press, 2012), and has also edited and published various works under the imprint Listening Chamber. His work has recently been published in BAX 2015: Best American Experimental Writing (Wesleyan University Press, 2016), as well as the magazines and journals Amerarcana, Aufgabe, BOMB, Hambone, Mandorla, pallaksch. pallaksch., and Vanitas. His work has also appeared online at EOAGH, Evening Will Come (the Volta), ONandOnScreen, and Open Space (San Francisco Museum of Modern Art). He received the BOMB Poetry Prize in 2014. Dickison lives in San Francisco, where he is director of the Poetry Center at San Francisco State University. He also teaches at San Francisco State University and California College of the Arts, Oakland. ‘the friend’  that the bird with the enormous velvet nerve-bodyarticulated legs more like an insect than I knewgreedy mouth wanted to feed out of my mouthapparently they are always hungry“what they are screaming is ada ada the word for pain”the verb was the same as in spanish ayudarecho’d “are you there?”   or in arabic wadada  “tears become pears for mothers to feed their children”_____19iii08        for McN  Julie Ezelle-Patton’s poetic work emphasizes collaboration, conservation work, curating, improvisation, and literary and musical composition. Her work has appeared in Critiphoria as well as poetry collections including BAX 2016: Best American Experimental Writing (Wesleyan University Press, 2017), Big Energy Poets: Ecopoetry Thinks Climate Change (BlazeVOX, 2017), What I Say: Innovative Poetry by Black Writers in America (University of Alabama Press, 2015), and I'll Drown My Book: Conceptual Writing by Women (Les Figues, 2012). She has performed in music, literary, and art festivals and venues in the United States and abroad. Patton is the author of Teething on Type (Rodent Press, 1996), “A Garden per Verse (or What Else Do You Expect from Dirt?)” (Hat, 1999), Notes for Some (Nominally) Awake (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs, 2007), and “Using Blue to Get Black” (Crayon, 2008), and the forthcoming works B (Tender Buttons Press) and Writing with Crooked Ink (Belladonna). The Building by the Side of the Road (About Place Journal, 2012) chronicles Ezelle-Patton’s adventures creating Let It Bee Ark Hives, an artist housing and conservation project based in her hometown, Cleveland. Ezelle-Patton is a 2018 Front Artist in Residence. She has been the recipient of a 2015 Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants to Artists for Poetry award and a 2012 Doan Brook Watershed Hero award, among other distinctions. PDF of Julie Ezelle-Patton's poem, ID     Dia:Chelsea FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SA;UNTIL=20260801T235900; Steve Dickison andJulie Ezelle-Patton
MOR_Arcs de cercle complémentaires n° 3 (Géométree n° 5C) (Complementary Arcs of Circle n. 3 [Geomet

Colloquium/Discussion

François Morellet Symposium


Dia:Chelsea

DiaTalks

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03/03/2018 11:00 03/03/2018 00:00 Europe/London François Morellet Symposium Event DetailsSaturday, March 3, 2018, 11 am Dia:Chelsea535 West 22nd Street, 5th FloorNew York City $5 for Dia members; $10 general admission; $8 admission for students and seniors  Advance ticket purchases recommended. Tickets are also available for purchase at the door, subject to availability. In conjunction with the exhibition of works by François Morellet, Dia Art Foundation hosts a group of scholars, curators, artists, and writers for a symposium on Morellet’s multifaceted oeuvre and extensive career. Speakers reflect on his practice from a diverse array of perspectives. Participants include Alexander Alberro, John Armleder, Daniel Levin Becker, Béatrice Gross, and Valerie Hillings.     Dia:Chelsea FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SA;UNTIL=20260801T235900; François Morellet Symposium
<p>Photo: Don Stahl</p>

Poetry Reading

Tonya Foster and Marcella Durand


Dia:Chelsea

Readings in Contemporary Poetry

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13/03/2018 18:30 13/03/2018 23:45 Europe/London Tonya Foster and Marcella Durand Event DetailsTuesday, March 13, 2018, 6:30 pmDia:Chelsea535 West 22nd Street, 5th FloorNew York City  Free for Dia members; $10 general admission; $6 admission for students and seniors Advance ticket purchases recommended. Tickets are also available for purchase at the door, subject to availability.  Tonya Foster is the author of the bilingual chapbook La Grammaire des Os (The Grammar of Bones [éditions joca seria, 2016]), the author of the poetry collection A Swarm of Bees in High Court (Belladonna, 2015), and a coeditor of Third Mind: Creative Writing through Visual Art (Teachers and Writers Collaborative, 2002). Foster is an assistant professor of writing, literature, and creative writing at California College of the Arts in Oakland, and is also a poetry editor at Fence magazine. Her work has been published in Callaloo, Hat, MiPOesias, NYFA Arts Quarterly, Poetry Project Newsletter, and Western Humanities Review, as well as on the Poetry Foundation website and elsewhere. from Etiquette           In collaboration with Alice Notley’s Descent of Alette… 2.Toddler-head tilted, fore-finger pressed againstthe side of his tender jaw, M. poses, looks like he’s thinking,looks like he’s looking at me looking at him; in the photo, looks like he’s looking through the remnantsI’ve made, at each you who holds the photos before your faceno matter how long after you’re looking at the him in this looking out. You see in the looking out and your looking in something of the selfthat you, years later, will come to know, will come to be, and to know and to be areforms of loving, are forms of holding a body and ideas of looking,of bodies in a mind like a prism. To say “Light falls” or “Night falls” is to speak of space, the curvatureswe navigate. Blood-bound, we are at B.’s Las Vegas wedding before you are you, and M. has just learned that a camera assembles and refracts. I point. He points. Each shot a we In-a-would-be-drowned city, what one girl sawof grief was the war-lost father and a baby brother laid out like expansesof water we, even as we stand on far shores, must cross. And the girl and M and you and I are blood-bound.It is sassy to say, “I see”; sassier to say, “I see you”;sassiest to say, “I see you looking at me,” to call outwhat we are looking for. 4.For a time, grief politely organized the water-logged girl politely.In a family photo, she sits center, hands folded in her lap. I hear that shewas for a long time largely quiet, holding her grief-strung tongue the way a proper lady is meant to. A woman watches her p’s and cues“woman” through the delicate clearing of her bangs or the smoothing of her skirt,value “biologically determined,” “socially performed.” In some corners, to ask “What are you looking at?” is another way of saying“What do you want?” Is another way of saying, “Keep that shit to yourself.”Is another way of saying, “I’m not available for the viewing.”  5.And a wake is another kind of viewing, a view of the surface of darknessoverfocused and announced, before underground.But laid out, he is still a young man. Laid out, he is always but a boy.  And you and M and the girl-come woman and I and they are blood-bound,are, of course, an iteration of we that wills out.“Endlessly endless” will… Marcella Durand’s most recent books are Rays of the Shadow (Tent Editions, 2017) and Le Jardin de M. (The Garden of M. [éditions joca seria, 2016]), with French translations by Olivier Brossard. Other books include: a collaboration with Tina Darragh, Deep eco pré (Little Red Leaves, 2009); AREA (Belladonna, 2008); and Traffic & Weather (Futurepoem, 2008), written during a residency at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. She lives in New York, where she is working on a long piece for two voices titled Mirror Lines and completing her translation of Michèle Métail’s book-length poem Les horizons du sol (The Horizons of the Soil, 1999). from Rays of the Shadow There are two words: leaf and reflection. We could allparlay via these words and grow conversation.Lights find their end in waves as ocean flowers toland under rain. Amorphous water, when will youtake shape and line? Like life in a like square. Withinit is the already seen and said. Reflect sayswater and leaf says light. Ardent over the land.     Dia:Chelsea FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SA;UNTIL=20260801T235900; Tonya Foster and Marcella Durand